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What should we do with our pumpkin decor now that Halloween is over?

At my MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers) meeting last week we had the opportunity to learn tips on great flower arranging from a lovely “mom mentor”.  So fun!  She gave us an idea for our pumpkins (real or faux) that offers a great transition into Thanksgiving. Thought you guys might enjoy this as well.

Here is the summary:
  Materials Needed:
  • Oasis (the green foamy thing that soaks up water and holds your flowers in place)
  • Vase (pumpkin)
  • Smaller container for the oasis to sit in the vase
  • Flowers
  • Backyard Greenery/Sticks

Steps:

1. Buy an oasis square and a hollowed out faux pumpkin from any craft store.  (you can ask the flower arranger to cut it for you if they don’t have a hollowed out pumpkin already).

2.  Soak oasis in bowl of water.  The longer the better- even overnight…but don’t push it down in the water…just let it slowly soak up the water like a sponge.

3.  Choose vase(pumpkin in this case) and trim oasis for a tight fit.  If you have a deep “vase” like a pumpkin or a pot, here’s a trick: set a smaller plastic container inside so the edges can rest around the top, then place the oasis in that smaller container.  The idea is that it becomes a vase inside a vase.  Hint: you can just use a Tupperware container for the “vase” if that’s all you have; the key is to simply make arrangement cover the entire container so that all you see is the arrangement.  If the oasis is not tightly fitting into your container, tape it down with floral tape.

Here is another option if you don't have a pumpkin, and want some height for your flowers. Note the green tape securing the oasis to this plastic container sitting on top of this pot...Whatever works!!

4.  Buy and trim flowers.  It is best to have an odd number of each type of flower to keep the look interesting.  Also, choose flowers of various sizes and textures, with a few different colors.  If possible, choose a small bunch of berries or mum “puffs” to bring variety as well.  After purchasing flowers, remember to trim them, cutting stems at angle to allow them the best absorption possible.

5.  Collect “backyard greenery” (or go to the nearest bike path if you are sneaky) and cut greenery to fill out the arrangement.  Great backyard foliage to use…Magnolia leaves, Aucuba, Holly leaves, Bells of Ireland, Fern, Lemon leaves (in this arrangement we used Aucuba, Fern and Lemon leaves)

6. Decide shape: Begin with the end in mind and decide what general shape you want the arrangement to have. Triangle, crescent, reverse crescent?  This has somewhat of a triangle shape.  Form the lines of your shape first, going “out and up” with sticks, cattail, long fern stems or something that can define the desired shape.  This becomes the skeleton of the arrangement.  Don’t be afraid to go tall and wide with this skeleton!

Start with the boldest and biggest and work around those (note the skinny sticks at the top and side...that set the shape for the whole arrangement.)

7. You can now start filling in the arrangement.  You can start by placing the biggest and brightest flowers around the center and bottom of the arrangement, then filling in with greens and smaller flowers as you continue.  Don’t be afraid to stick flowers straight out to the sides and straight up to follow the set “skeleton” of the arrangement.

Fill in with the "backyard greenery" (in this pic you can see the plastic container that is holding the oasis)

Keep filling, but don't over stuff it..."leave the flowers room to breathe" said our instructor 🙂

Have fun with this, and “go with your gut” as our wonderful instructor told us!!
Here’s the final product!

Just beautiful...you can do it too!!!

FYI:  Here are some other looks I found online.

I found this arrangement selling online for $50-70, our arrangement costs less than $25. *Our Flowers: $17 from Trader Joe's (a pre-arranged bouquet and then 2 other smaller "filler" bunches) + some leaves/ferns from the yard.*Pumkin vase $6.50

This could be a more simple idea to replicate with these inexpensive flowers and berries